Social Studies

All courses in the social studies department have been developed to prompt questions and challenge students to assess, interpret and provide a framework for recognizing and accepting responsibility as individuals and as citizens.

Students in Grade 9 must select two semesters of Global Studies or two semesters of AP Human Geography.

Students in Grade 10 must select two semesters of World History or two semesters of AP World History.

Students in Grade 11 must select two semesters of U.S. History or AP U.S. History. 

Students in Grade 12 are required to complete U.S. Government & Politics and Economics, Advanced Placement Government with Economics or AP Microeconomics with Government.

Course #         Course NameGradesPrerequisiteSemester 
Credits

S100  S101

Global Studies A & B9None2

S105  S106

AP Human Geography A & B9Recommended: B or higher in current Social Studies class 2
S110
S112 
World History A & B10None2
S930
S932 
AP World History A & B10Recommended: B in AP Human Geograpy or A in Global Studies2
S210
S212 
U.S. History A & B11None2

S950
S952 
AP U.S. History A & B11Recommended: B in AP World History or A in World History2
S310U.S. Government & Politics12None1
S315Economics12None1

S917
S918

AP Microeconomics with Government A & B12Recommended: B in AP U.S. History or A in U.S. History2
S920
S922 
AP U.S. Government with Economics A & B12Recommended: B in AP U.S. History or A in U.S. History2
S550Anthropology9-12None1
S580Law and Justice9-12None1
S570Philosophy9-12None1
S530Psychology I9-12None1

S630

Psychology II9-12Psychology I1
S960
S962
AP Psychology A & B10-12Recommended: B or higher in current Social Studies class 2
S540Sociology9-12Recommended: Grade 10-121


Global Studies A & B

Students in Global Studies use the tools of the geographer and a spatial perspective to explore and analyze local, regional and global themes related to population, cultural, political, agricultural, economic and urban geography. Students will begin to develop the disposition and capacity to understand and act on issues of global significance.

Return to Top

 

AP Human Geography A & B

AP Human Geography is a rigorous, fast-paced, in-depth high school level course equivalent to an introductory college course. Through the lens of human geography, students will study topics including Nature and Perspectives of Geography, Population, Cultural, Political, Agricultural, Economic and Urban Geography. Students will work with geographic technologies including Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Best indicators for success in this class are solid reading and writing skills, organization, a strong work ethic and a willingness to be an active participant in learning. All students are encouraged to take the AP Human Geography Exam in May.  Students who did not earn a B or higher in their previous Social Studies class should seek a teacher recommendation before registering for this course.

Return to Top

 

World History A & B

This course surveys the development of culture from prehistoric times to the modern era. The course is organized to combine universal patterns and particular cultures. Important ideas that have influenced humanity throughout the ages, focusing on the rise, maintenance and fall of world cultures and civilizations and the foundations of major events are included. Themes of history, geography, government, economy, education, arts and architecture, religions, and gender roles will be examined.

Return to Top

 

Advanced Placement (AP) World History A & B

Students may take two semesters of AP World History to meet the World History graduation requirement. Students wishing to complete studies equivalent to an introductory college course in world history will use a combination of factual knowledge and analytic skill, develop an understanding of global processes, and examine contact among many types of human societies. Using specific themes, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage from prehistory to the present to prepare students for the AP Exam offered by the College Board each May. Textbooks are provided; however, students may wish to purchase their own.  Students who did not earn a B or higher in their previous Social Studies class should seek a teacher recommendation before registering for this course.

Return to Top

 

U.S. History A & B

This course includes study of the formation of the United States, the Civil War, U.S. industrialization, immigration, imperialism, the World Wars, the Progressive Era, the Great Depression, the Cold War, Vietnam, and modern American history.  The course focuses on developing skills that include analyzing documents, exploring various points of view, reading comprehension, and effectively articulating ideas both verbally and in written format.

Return to Top

 

Advanced Placement (AP) U.S. History A & B

AP U.S. History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university U.S. history course.  In AP U.S. History students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods from approximately 1491 to the present.  Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical comparisons; and utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time.  The course also provides seven themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society.  Students who did not earn a B or higher in their previous Social Studies class should seek a teacher recommendation before registering for this course.

Return to Top

 

 

U.S. Government & Politics

This one semester course will focus on the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and civic engagement, origin and structure of the U.S. government, civil rights and civil liberties and public policy issues. Students will develop an understanding of how the United States government embodies the principles and ideals of a democratic republic by examining the foundation documents on which it is based. Areas of study will include, but are not limited to, current events and issues, getting involved in the political process, democratic ideas and the Constitution, foundation documents, landmark Supreme Court cases, civil rights and liberties and current public policy issues.

Return to Top

 

Economics

This one semester course will consist of main units of study that will focus on introductory economic concepts, microeconomics, macroeconomics and the global economy. Students will explore the exciting world of investing, the stock market, and the economic impact on both the U.S. and International Markets.

Return to Top

 

Advanced Placement (AP) Microeconomics with Government A & B

AP Microeconomics and Government is a sequential course that builds on skills learned throughout the two semesters and meets the graduation requirement.  This course is for students who wish to complete studies equivalent to a college introduction to microeconomics.  In particular, students study consumers and producers in an economy: households, firms, governments, and community organizations.  The primary focus is on the function of consumers and producers within the economic system.  The course also offers analysis of the markers in which consumers and producers interact.

Throughout the course, US government concepts are explored regarding public policy and taxation.  In the spring, especially following the AP exam in early May, student attention focuses on the foundations of US government, civic engagement, liberty and justice.

The AP Microeconomics exam is offered by The College Board.  There are no summer assignments and all necessary textbooks are provided.  Students who did not earn a B or higher in their previous Social Studies class should seek a teacher recommendation before registering for this course.

Return to Top

 

Advanced Placement (AP) U.S. Government with Economics A & B

AP Government and Economics is a sequential course that builds on skills learned throughout the two semesters and meets the graduation requirement. This course is for students who wish to complete studies equivalent to a college introductory course in U.S. Government and Politics. Goals of the course include: a). exposing students to the expectations that they face in college with regards to reading, writing, discussion and daily preparation for class, b). becoming aware of the role that all levels of government and politics play in the lives of U.S. citizens, c). identifying and exploring the critical political and economic issues that are, and will be, impacting the lives of students for the next generation, and d). providing and seeking out opportunities that allow students to actually participate in their government. Specific topics to be covered include constitutional underpinnings of the U.S. Government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, institutions and policy processes of the national government and civil rights and civil liberties.

Throughout the course, macro economic concepts are explored as we trace public policy formation. In the spring of the year, especially following the AP exam in early May, student attention turns toward micro economic analysis. Specific economic topics include scarcity and resource management, supply and demand, fiscal and monetary policy and international economic issues. Students are encouraged to take the AP exam offered by The College Board each May. Summer assignments are optional. Textbooks are provided; however, students may wish to purchase their own.  Students who did not earn a B or higher in their previous Social Studies class should seek a teacher recommendation before registering for this course.

Return to Top

 

Anthropology

Have you ever wondered what really makes people different from one another and what are the things we all share in common?  This course presents an intriguing introduction to both Cultural and Physical Anthropology - the study of humankind everywhere, throughout time.  An opportunity to investigate and examine human cultural and biological diversity (paleoanthropology) while gaining a global view of humanity. Class discussions based upon college-level texts. 

Return to Top

 

Law and Justice

Can a police officer search your car?  Can school officials search my locker?  What are my Constitutional rights? When can I sue someone? Law and Justice will provide you with the answers to many interesting legal issues.  Will introduce you to the origins and history of law and focus on the American judicial system. Explores your legal rights and responsibilities, examine causes of criminal behavior and analyze the criminal justice system. Current legal issues discussed daily and opportunities to explore careers in law and law enforcement will be offered. Projects and activities include presentations, case studies, guest speakers, and at times mock trial.  If you are considering studying law in the future, this elective should be a priority. A challenging elective that will be relevant to your life and future.

Return to Top

 

Philosophy

Philosophy is a discussion oriented course designed to examine many of life's most controversial questions. How do we know what is real? How do we decide right from wrong? What is justice? What type of government is best for society? Philosophical views from eastern and western cultures will be studied from their pre-Socratic beginnings to the present. Major units include: Metaphysics, Free Will/Determinism, Existentialism, Ethics, Political Philosophy, and Religion.

Return to Top

 

Psychology I

Psychology is the study of behavior. In this course, the student will develop an understanding of himself/herself as an individual and as a social person relating to other people. The following units will be explored: modern schools of psychological thought, research methods, biopsychology, status of consciousness, development and personality development.

Return to Top

 

Psychology II

Psychology II is designed to continue an exploration of psychological topics with a special emphasis on those psychological areas associated with social psychology. The major units include: motivation and emotions, learning, cognition and intelligence psychological disorders, positive psychology and social psychology.

Return to Top

 

Advanced Placement Psychology A & B

AP program provides an opportunity for secondary school students to pursue and receive credit for college-level course work at the secondary school level. Sponsored by the College Board, the program is based on the premise that college-level material can be taught successfully to able and well prepared secondary school students. At completion of this course the student will be eligible to take the College Board test and students scoring well on the exam may earn college credit. Major subject areas of this course include history, theoretical approaches, research methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, state of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, development, personality, testing and individual differences, abnormal behavior, treatment of psychological disorders, and social behavior. Prepares students for the required AP Exam offered by The College Board each May and provides students with college readiness skills like critical thinking, analysis, evaluation, note-taking strategies, group collaboration and test preparation.  E-textbooks are provided; however, students may wish to purchase their own textbook.  Students who did not earn a B or higher in their previous Social Studies class should seek a teacher recommendation before registering for this course.

Return to Top

 

Sociology

Sociology is a project-intensive course designed to give students a framework in which to understand the world. That framework is developed by studying society and the interactions of people within social groups. Will analyze and interpret many types of social behavior ranging from deviance and conformity to gender and family roles. Included in the course will be an investigation of the process by which people learn the values, roles, beliefs and rules of behavior in their culture.

Return to Top