Language Arts

Language Arts staff serve students in an effort to develop a lifelong love of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students develop skills and strategies as critical thinkers while immersing themselves in literacy and written communication. Minnesota State Standards are addressed and remedial and advanced courses offer rigorous opportunities for all students.

Students are expected to be actively engaged in close reading activities, writing process, and cooperative/collaborative learning. Students are encouraged and supported in efforts to develop a greater appreciation and respect for all forms of literature while using language as a tool for increased communication in multiple forms.

Requirements: Students are required to earn eight credits in grades 9-12.

*Students taking the AP exams will be charged a fee set by the College Board.
 

 Language Arts

 Course # 

Course NameGradesPrerequisiteSemester 
Credits
 L100  L102English 9 A & B9None2
 L105  L107English 9 Enriched A & B9None2
 L110  L112English 10 A & B10None2
 L120  L122English 10 Enriched A & B10None2
 L210  L220English 11 A & B11None2
 L531

English 11 Newspaper A & B* (year long)

10-12None2
 L950  L952AP English Language and Composition A & B11None 2
 L300  L310English 12 A & B12None2
 L534  L536English 12: Journalism/Yearbook A & B**9-12None2
 L960  L962AP English Literature and Composition A & B12None2
 S510Debate9-12None1
 L540Speech9-12None1

* English 11 Newspaper A & B satisfies a year-long requirement for 11th grade junior English.  This class may be taken grades 10 and 12 as a Language Arts elective course.

** English 12 Journalism/Yearbook A & B satisfies a year-long requirement for 12th grade senior English. This class may also be taken in grades 9, 10 and 11 as a Language Arts elective course or an Art credit.

English 9 A & B

English 9 is a course designed to study a wide variety of literature including novels, short stories, poetry, drama and nonfiction. Students are introduced to a range of both contemporary and class literature. English 9 students focus on language arts skills such as critical reading, academic writing process, public speaking, and discussion techniques.

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English 9 Enriched A & B

English 9 Enriched is a pre-Advanced Placement (AP) course designed to challenge students with a rigorous literature and composition-based curriculum. Students are introduced to both contemporary and classic literature and study a wide variety of skills including critical reading, academic writing process, public speaking, and discussion techniques. Because this is a pre-AP course students need a strong commitment; they should be passionate about and willing to read, write, and actively participate in class discussions and activities. Students in this course should also have an above-average reading ability and strong foundation in writing composition.

 

 
English 10 A & B
 
English 10 emphasizes a variety of reading, writing, viewing, speaking and listening activities throughout both semesters. Semester one focuses on the analysis of narrative techniques, themes and character development in fiction. Students will write a personal narrative essay and a critical analysis essay. Students will also construct and deliver a multi-media presentation on an independent reading book of their choice. Students will also focus on note-taking skills and organizational strategies. Semester two focuses more on analyzing non-fiction through articles, essays and media literacy work. Students will analyze and evaluate persuasive texts, both written and visual. Papers and speeches will focus around analysis and evaluation of such texts. Preparation for the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessment II/GRAD in reading is embedded in this course. The literature for this course is a combination of contemporary and classic texts, as well as current events articles and media.
 
English 10 Enriched A & B
 
Semester one is a pre-AP class for the highly motivated, mature, and self-disciplined student who has the time and willingness to make English a priority. A combination of classic and contemporary literature is the basis for this discussion-based class. Students will be expected to examine and produce a variety of writing styles, including narrative and analytical. Emphasizes close reading and analytical writing skills as well as note-taking and organizational skills. Daily homework is assigned. Semester two is designed to build on the reading strategies and writing styles introduced in semester ‘A’ and prepare students for college level AP English. As with semester ‘A’, being a highly motivated, mature, and self-disciplined student is essential for success in this discussion-based class. The class uses both fiction and non-fiction literature to develop the student’s ability to read and analyze literature. Daily homework is assigned.
 
English 11 A & B
 
This course introduces students to a selection of classic, contemporary, and diverse American literature organized thematically or chronologically. Students focus on a variety of texts ranging from drama, poetry, essays, novels, short stories, autobiography, non-fiction, and historical documents to study the development of American language, thought and values. In addition to reading, students focus on persuasive writing, critical and expository writing, creative and descriptive writing, poetry analysis, and public speaking.
 
English 12: Journalism/Yearbook A & B

In this co-curricular class, English 12 journalism-yearbook students will focus on media studies, critical readings, thinking, discussion and journalistic writing. Students will study media and its influence on the culture by examining newspapers, magazines, advertising, photography and First Amendment Press Law. Students will learn journalistic writing style by practicing news, features, sports, narrative and investigative reporting (research) formats. Journalistic story structure and development, interviewing, craftsmanship, and reporting techniques are explored. Students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written stories on a regular basis, editing for the correct use of the conventions and mechanics to publish for a variety of audiences and purposes, including the SAHS Kabekonian yearbook. Yearbook work is hands-on, advanced-level publications work designed to teach 21st Century skills such as group planning and collaboration. Students in the class will plan production and marketing of an award-winning yearbook. Students who are strong in English skills, computer work or creative endeavors typically do well in this course. Deadlines are involved that must be met. Students should have displayed reliability and initiative in other classes. Students will participate in all aspects of the yearbook publishing process including: photography/editing, information graphic and print layout design via industry-standard software, social media publishing, and business practices through advertising sales. Students will work together on teams in order to make yearbook deadlines. A minimum of one hour after school per month is required for all students. Students who participate in the class after school as Editors or Team Leaders may qualify for an Academic Letter and Quill and Scroll.

*English 12-Journalism-Yearbook satisfies a year-long requirement for 12th grade junior English. This class may be taken grades 10 and 11 as a Language Arts elective course or an Art credit.

*Students who are NCAA eligible can take either newspaper or journalism, but not both for English credit.


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English 11 Newspaper A & B

In this co-curricular class, English 11 Newspaper students will learn how journalism and the media function in society by providing them hands-on experiences on a flexible schedule. Newspapers, multi-media sources, and professional journalism stories and texts are read, analyzed both in writing and orally to foster an appreciation of differing views, attitudes, and opinions. Students are introduced to the principles of news media evaluation and newswriting, through the study and critical analysis of news, sports, feature, and opinion writing. News story structure and development, interviewing, craftsmanship, and reporting techniques are explored. Students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written articles on a regular basis, editing for the correct use of the conventions and mechanics to publish for a variety of audiences and purposes, including St. Croix Valley media outlets. Ethics and legal aspects of student media are also covered. Students will participate in all aspects of the publishing process including: photography/editing, online publishing (including blogging and podcasting), broadcast journalism, information graphic and print layout design via industry-standard software, social media publishing, and business practices through advertising sales. Students will publish online issues, print issues, and broadcast TV shows, while meeting frequent deadlines. A minimum of one hour after school per month is required for all students.  Students who participate in the class after school as an Editor may qualify for an Academic Letter and Quill and Scroll. 

* English 11 Newspaper A & B satisfies a year-long requirement for 11th grade junior English. This class may be taken grades 10 and 12 as a Language Arts elective course.

*Students who are NCAA eligible can take either newspaper or journalism, but not both for English credit.
 
 
 
AP English Language and Composition A & B
 
AP Language and Composition has a strong appeal for the college-bound and academically-motivated student. Students will critically read from a variety of sophisticated texts. While some American literature selections are included throughout the year, the majority of texts read are nonfiction (e.g. essays, articles, letters, memoir, and nontraditional text). Student writing will focus on argumentative essays, the synthesis of varied sources, and rhetorical analysis. Students will be prepared and encouraged to sit for the AP Language and Composition exam in May. As most colleges grant students credit, placement, or both for successful AP exam scores, students should expect to spend a significant amount of time in rigorous writing and reading throughout this course.
 
 
AP English Literature and Composition A & B
 
The class is designed specifically for students who intend to go to a four-year college. Enroll in the flex class if you want the opportunity to assume greater responsibility for your learning in an environment that more closely resembles a university schedule. Regardless of whether you enroll in the flex class or a traditional class section, all students will have the opportunity to cultivate reading and writing skills that are required at the college level.  While open to students who want to be challenged, semester one of this class builds on skills developed in AP English Language & Composition and demands consistent focus and dedication on the part of the student. The class emphasizes close reading and analytical writing skills as well as note taking and organizational strategies. Semester two builds on skills developed in AP Literature & Composition A. This semester provides the opportunity to apply those reading and writing strategies introduced the first semester, further preparing students for both the college experience and the AP Literature & Composition exam in May. Textbooks are provided; however, students may choose to purchase their own.

 
English 12 A & B
 
Semester one emphasizes reading, writing, and public speaking drawing on novels and shorter texts. Students will sample American, world, and British literature, including Shakespeare's Macbeth or Hamlet. Students will read texts regarded as relevant and thought-provoking. Written work will include personal narrative and literary analysis. Materials are intended to help students acquire skills in comprehension and analysis, while at the same time allowing for development of personal voice. Students will continue to develop and strengthen study skills, note-taking, and organizational strategies. Semester two focuses on more contemporary fiction and non-fiction selections. This course is designed to build skills necessary to develop life-long appreciation of reading. Materials are intended to help students acquire skills in comprehension and analysis, while at the same time allowing for development of personal voice as students respond to literature. Students will continue to develop and strengthen study skills, notetaking, and organizational strategies. Over the course of the semester, students will complete a major research project, incorporating a minimum of two literary works and secondary sources. This capstone project requires selecting and narrowing a topic, conducting independent research, composing the essay, documenting/citing their sources.
 
 
Debate 
 
This one semester course is designed to develop skills in critical thinking, organization, research, argumentation, public speaking, decision-making, and thinking under pressure. Classic Debate format and current issues will be explored. Debate is especially helpful to students interested in post secondary education and the job market, including but not limited to; communications, law, medicine, business, international relations, and politics. Debate usually has a strong appeal for the college-bound and academically-motivated student.
 
 
Speech
 
This one semester course is designed to develop skills in critical thinking, organization, research, presentation, drama, language, and public speaking. Thirteen different categories of speech will be explored in both spheres of public address and dramatic interpretation. Speech is especially helpful to students interested in post secondary education and the job market, including but not limited to; communications, law, medicine, business, international relations, and politics. Speech usually has a strong appeal for the college-bound and academically-motivated student.