Programs

 

Early Literacy Parent Information

Five Essential Components of Reading

  1. Phonemic Awareness: Knowledge and manipulation of sounds in spoken words.  Done with the ears.  Kindergarten example: rhyming words like see, be, me, tree, flea.  Second grade example: say the word stop without the /s/ sound and you have top.
  2. Phonics: Relationship between written/spoken letters and sounds. Phonics are done with both the ears and eyes together.  Kindergarten example: c a t = /c/ /a/ /t/ = “cat”.  Second grade example: give me 4 ways you can write the vowel sound /ee/= ee (tree), ea (eat), e-silent e (Steve), ie (Maggie).
  3. Reading Fluency: A Student’s ability to read with accuracy, rate, expression, and phrasing.
  4. Vocabulary/Word Study: Knowledge of words definitions and context. Patterns of words.  Students look for patterns in words and find similarities that create a “rule” in order to better use that pattern in spelling and writing.  Example: I know that the sound /ow/ can be written two ways- ow like cow or ou like out.  If I learn this “rule” and it’s exceptions, I can then read and spell words that follow that pattern.  Like the word, cloud.  Older student example: I know that the prefix “re” means to do again, so the word rearrange would mean to move something around.
  5. Reading Comprehension: Understanding the meaning of text. Literal (the facts) and Inferential (what I know from the facts).

What Can Parents Do to help each area?

  1. Phonemic Awareness: Rhyming games in the car.  Change the first sound in “pig” to /d/.  Change the first sound in “chop” to /sh/.
  2. Phonics: Manipulating sounds with letters.  D i m says “dim” add a silent e, “dime”.  Talk about vowel sounds, beginning sounds, and ending sounds in isolation.
  3. Fluency: Repeated reading with finger tracking under each word (see, say and track). Reading for pleasure to increase vocabulary development and fluency as well as reinforcement.
  4. Vocabulary / Word Study:  Talk about words and how they are connected, as well as patterns in words (little, middle, fiddle).
  5. Reading Comprehension:    “Think aloud”: Tell your child “how” you are figuring out what the story means.  Story: bark, outside, leaves (tree)/(dog).

Essential Components of Writing/Cross Curricular Connections

  1. Prewriting: Getting ready to write.
  2. Drafting: Making choices what to write.
  3. Revising: Mechanics/Where and how to communicate.
  4. Editing: Satisfied with content and organization, free of errors.
  5. Publishing: Complete the product.

Essential Components of Writing: Parent

  1. Encourage child to think about what they could write about. (Pictures/Words) 
  2. Start writing and encourage choices.
  3. Edit only when necessary.
  4. Publish at home. in a variety of ways so that it increases the quality of work.  

Novelist

www.co.washington.mn.us/info_for_residents/library/

150,000 titles Fiction/Nonfiction

Will need a library card and Internet access.

Sort by: interest, author, series, award winners, age, grade or reading levels.

Angie Weisbrod

Literacy Curriculum Specialist

weisbroda@stillwater.k12.mn.us

 

Art at Rutherford

This year every class will have two formal art lessons in the art room each month throughout the school year. One will be taught by a licensed art teacher resident- Lea Brynestad. Each month students will study a new art element. Watch for our student's creativity to come to life as their work is hung throughout the school.

Read With Me

Read With Me is a small group instructional support program offered to students in Stillwater Schools. Read With Me is available to students in grades 1-6 who demonstrate the need for additional reading instruction.